Religion

Who Would You Die for, There is No Greater Love?

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“Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down one’s life for one’s friends,” John 15:13

Who would you die for?

Would that decision be spontaneous, like your sister is drowning in a lake and you try to rescue her even though you can’t swim?  Or have you already made the choice, such as if your  family is ever in danger, you’ll gladly step in front of a bullet if that’s would keep them safe.  Or a friend needs a kidney transplant, you volunteer despite the risk to your own health. Or a combat soldier who will follow orders even though he will be open to machine gun fire?

Jesus made the choice to die for us on the cross.  Because gave his life so our sins are washed away and He serves as an intercessor for us in Heaven.  What a friend is He?

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He made the choice to follow His Father’s decision that He be ransomed for our sin.  “Father, if you are will, take this cup from me: yet not my will, but yours be done,” Luke 22:42.

Giving up your life is never easy, but “if you haven’t found something you are willing to die for, you aren’t fit to live,”  says the Rev.  Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who gave his life for  what he believed.

What would you die for?

 

 

 

Gratitude is a Funny Thing

 

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“I know how to be brought low, and I know how to abound. In any and every circumstance, I have learned the secret of facing plenty and hunger, abundance and need. I can do all things through him who strengthens me,” Philippians 4:12-13

Gratitude is a funny thing.  You never know when it will strike you.  Or when you will find yourself in need of it.  I now, for example, feel gratitude every time someone holds the door open for me, lets me cut in near the beginning of a long food line or carries something to heavy or awkward for me.
It wasn’t always that way.  Before 2013, I had a strong, able body.  I didn’t need help with such things.  But, as they say, that all changed in the twinkling of an eye.  A health condition left me without the use of my right arm, difficulty walking and slurred speech.  Overnight, I went from an assistance giver to someone who needs assistance.
I don’t ask for assistance.  I still can do tasks for myself, but it takes longer or special equipment.
I’ve found that about 90 percent of people help without being asked.  The remaining folks seem too absorbed in their own lives.  They might rush through a door without giving you a glance,  make sure not to make eye contact, or sprint to the last shopping cart ahead of you.
Especially helpful, are those who ask if you want help before offering it.  Such as, “May I help you with the door?”  It’s an important courtesy.  I remember being proud of how I was walking–though slowly–and wanting the exercise of walking through one of the Wal-Mart.  A lady about 40, without asking, brought me an electric cart to ride in.  I didn’t want to hurt her feelings, so I rode in it.
But I’ve learned to be content in my condition.  Barring a miracle–and I’m not ruling that out–these deficits are permanent.  Still, I have all that I need to live as normal a life as possible with the gratitude of others, and through Him that strengthens me.


Edward Wills is a Christian writer and blogger.  He lives in Holly Ridge, NC.
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