The Christian Effectiveness Officer (C.E.O.) (Clayton Pruett) — SBC Voices

Over the last few years, a stunning shift has taken place in church culture. Successful, influential, and powerful pastors are being dismissed from their churches. Not for the typical moral failures or money scandals but for unhealthy leadership practices. Why has this become such an issue? Understanding the problem The simplified version is that decades…

The Christian Effectiveness Officer (C.E.O.) (Clayton Pruett) — SBC Voices

Nature Reveals God’s Perfection to Us All

Years ago, a friend and I took a backpacking trip on the Appalachian Trail. It was a short trip via the nation’s premier hiking path. For us, it was a mere three days and two nights. Many others hikers take months to cover the entire 2,200-mile foot path from Georgia to Maine. As we hiked near Damascus, Virginia, when the spring blooms were fresh on the trees, we were awe struck by the beauty God’s handiwork.

Taking a break at the top of a hill, a silver, rock-strewn creek meandered along the bottom. Fresh magnolias bloomed. The colors of the painter’s palette treated our eyes and the smell of the exploding forest surrounded us. Such beauty makes me think of how it must have been at creation.

“God is everywhere. Take a step outside and you will be surrounded by the intricacies and fascinating systematic creation that was created by our God. He is in the mountains, the beaches, jungles, ocean depths, prairies, farmland, deserts, and valleys,” Mandy Smith writes on her website, https://www.ibelieve.com/faith

God’s handiwork is all around us. That’s why Romans 1:20 struck me so.

For His invisible attributes that is eternal power and divine nature have been clearly seen since the creation of the world being understood through what He made.

Question: How have we known God’s handiwork and not recognized Him as creator? How can we attribute nature’s awesomeness to the Big Bang Theory or evolution without proof evidence.

A long time ago, I accepted that God created the world. I acknowledged that it was not a random collection of molecules from a primal swamp as the evolutionists claim. Why? Exhibit A is the majesty of the human body. How else could the body come into existence with the merger of two cells, yet grow to–in some cases—more than seven-feet tall and live for more than 100 years? How else is just the right amount of blood run through our veins? How else do a man and a woman come together to produce a child?

Think for a moment about your body and how magnificent it is. The brain is the best computer ever invented. The eyes are unmatched by any optical lens. We–unlike any other animal– can use tools to make marvelous things like airplanes.

How appropriate that we don’t have to search too far for an answer to how this came into being. This question was answered in the first verses of the Bible. As if God positioned it in the first verse of the first chapter for emphasis.

In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth, Genesis 1:1

Application: Have you accepted that God created the world and accepted Jesus Christ as your savior? If not, why not? To become a Christian, pray this simple prayer.

Father, I know that I am a sinner and that distance from you to me is huge. I am sorry for my sins. I’m asking that you forgive them. I accept that Christ died for my sins and the sins of all. Jesus, take over my life and lead me on the right path. I cannot do this alone. Send the Holy Spirit into my life. Amen.

Then, find a Bible-based, local church that can help you grow in your walk with Christ.


A Different Way of “Reading” the Bible

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“Faith comes by hearing, and hearing by the word of Christ,” Romans 10:17  (ESV)

We all know that the Bible is the word of God, that it is the most read book in human history (estimates of 6 billion copies printed), and that there are more than 6,900  translations.  But is reading the best way to absorb the word of God?  Are there advantages to hearing it?

Recently, I fell behind in my effort to read the Bible through in a year.  Something always got in the way:  Meetings, work, family time.  Reading the Bible was pushed to the side.  I didn’t want to be a slacker.  I wanted to keep this commitment.

Then, I remembered that several years ago I listened to the Bible on CDs.  I enjoyed the richness of the Lord’s teaching, but somehow in the move from Indiana to North Carolina, the CDs got lost.  Should I buy another set?  Was this my answer for staying up on my read-the-Bible-through-in-a-year assignments?  Could I stream the Bible for free online?

No.  Yes.  Yes.  I eventually found out.  I decided to avoid the cost of a new set of CDs because I could listen for free from multiple sources.  This was the answer.

This new way of “reading” turned dead time into useful time.  For example, on my 30-minue weekly trip to Wilmington, I listen to more than my daily assignment.  I hear the Bible while making a pot of  beef stew, doing yoga, or riding the exercise bike.

Sites to download or stream the Bible are plentiful on the Internet.   All I had to do was click on the speaker icon on Biblegateway.com to hear the word in the elegant voice of Max McLean read Exodus to Revelation.  Unlike me, Max doesn’t stumble over names of places like Kiriathiam or names of people like Jehoichin.  But there are other great site too, including Biblestudytools.com, audiobible.com, and theonlineword.com, to name just a few.

Whether you read the Bible, as has been done for thousands of years, or listen to Scripture through online streaming or downloads–as we’ve done the last 30 years or so, the truths of the Bible are a priceless guide.
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Is Christ’s Death on the Cross like Capital Punishment?

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Pope Francis

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Although I am not Catholic, I have always appreciated the Pope’s stance on the issues of the day.  How we treat the poor, the unborn, and divorce are all issues of the Pope’s leadership for the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics and many others, Christian, and non-Christian worldwide.

So when Pope Francis last month reversed the church’s position on capital punishment–stating it is “inadmissible” because it “attacks” the inherent dignity of all humans,” as reported in USA Today, an American newspaper, I listened.

“The Vatican said the pontiff approved a change to the catechism, which gives worshippers a go-to guide for official Catholic Church teachings on subjects ranging from the sacraments to sex. Previously, the catechism said the church didn’t exclude capital punishment “if this is the only possible way of effectively defending human lives against the unjust aggressor.” says USA Today.

My previous view of capital punishment is that it’s wrong to deprive another of her or his life, except in limited and extreme circumstances.  My reason reflected the fact of racial and economic imbalances in those executions and the number of inmates on Death Row found proven innocent by organizations like the Innocence Project.  I believed that some people, like terrorists who killed scores of innocents, though, deserved to die.  Of course, their deaths would not bring those people back to life, but it gave me some satisfaction.

“For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Jesus Christ our Lord,” Romans 6:23

But it wasn’t until a Facebook post on the page of a friend, a retired Methodist pastor in Indiana, that my view radically changed, like a slap in the face, being dunked in cold water, or an electric shock.  He wrote simply “Kudos, to Pope Francis,”  Then came the surprising words from a woman responding to his post:  ” Try to remember that your salvation is the result of the death penalty.”

What?  My life being spared?  I have never killed anyone, stolen anything, or been arrested.  What did she mean?

I had never thought of salvation–deliverance from God’s wrath– in comparison to capital punishment.  I had been condemned to die, but by going to the cross, Jesus stepped up and took my place.  Yet it seems a good comparison.  In one the courts condemn an individual to death.  In the other, God sentenced us to die ( the wages of sin, Romans 6:23) but loves us so much that He provides His only Son to die in our place.

Is there any greater love?  “Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friend,”  it says in John 15:13.  Jesus set an example of this love when He followed the agonizing path to the cross.  Without this sacrifice, no one would have eternal life.

Adam and Eve existed in a perfect world, but they chose to sin.  As a result, they were forced from Eden to live in a world of hardship and the death of the physical body and the soul.  The world we live in today.

How do you feel about capital punishment now?  Does Jesus’ sacrifice affect your opinion?  Is there a comparison between the two?  For me, like the Death Row prisoner who gets a reprieve from the governor,  I am so relieved and thankful.  And I grant my fellow humans–any and all on them–a reprieve from death, no matter how gruesome, the number murdered, or the circumstances.  They deserve punishment, but not death.

And I thank Pope Francis for pointing that out.

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Starting a Conversation with a Stranger

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“Above all, love each other deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins. Offer hospitality to one another without grumbling,” 1 Peter 4:8

I admit it, I am not the most hospitable person on the world. I’m one of those persons who never learned to smile. Most of the time, I’m stone faced.  I’m a proud introvert.  I don’t mean to be standoffish, but sometimes I am.

But is that an effective witness for Christ? Was Jesus an introvert?  How many opportunities to witness have you, and I, missed?  For example, when Jesus was travelling through hostile Samaria and stopped by a well.  He starts a conversation with a woman, then offers her “living water,”  as told in John 4:10.  A pretty extroverted act.

Clearly, Jesus was not an introvert. He often started conversations with strangers.  And we must emulate Him. “But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you; and you will be my witnesses … to the ends of the earth” (Acts 1:8).

We must be bold in sharing!  While screaming the gospel on a street corner may not be the best way to share, we do not want to be a closet Christian either.  “But whoever denies me before men, I also will deny before my Father who is in Heaven,” it says in Matthew 10:33.

We must be hospitable to others.  Our kindness will create opportunities to witness.

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“But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you; and you will be my witnesses … to the ends of the earth” (Acts 1:8).

Who Would You Die for, There is No Greater Love?

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“Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down one’s life for one’s friends,” John 15:13

Who would you die for?

Would that decision be spontaneous, like your sister is drowning in a lake and you try to rescue her even though you can’t swim?  Or have you already made the choice, such as if your  family is ever in danger, you’ll gladly step in front of a bullet if that’s would keep them safe.  Or a friend needs a kidney transplant, you volunteer despite the risk to your own health. Or a combat soldier who will follow orders even though he will be open to machine gun fire?

Jesus made the choice to die for us on the cross.  Because gave his life so our sins are washed away and He serves as an intercessor for us in Heaven.  What a friend is He?

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He made the choice to follow His Father’s decision that He be ransomed for our sin.  “Father, if you are will, take this cup from me: yet not my will, but yours be done,” Luke 22:42.

Giving up your life is never easy, but “if you haven’t found something you are willing to die for, you aren’t fit to live,”  says the Rev.  Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who gave his life for  what he believed.

What would you die for?